Sunday, February 27, 2022

History and Heraldry of the 177th Brigade Engineer Battalion

By Maj. William Carraway

Historian, Georgia Army National Guard

 

The distinctive unit insignia of the 177th Brigade Engineer Battalion, pictured in October 2021 in Macon, Ga. Photo by Maj. William Carraway.

Heraldry[1]

On February 27, 2009, The US Army Institute of Heraldry approved the distinctive unit insignia of the 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion which was subsequently redesignated the 177th Brigade Engineer Battalion. The insignia incorporates the color scarlet to represent the engineer heritage of the battalion. Scarlet also symbolizes valor and sacrifice while gold symbolizes honor and high achievement. The castle further symbolizes the engineer’s role in fortification. Combat multiplier capabilities of the battalion, such as infantry, chemical, military police, transportation, and engineers, are represented by the bayonet, cobalt blue, green, brick red, and scarlet, respectively. The lightning bolt emblazoned on the bayonet highlights the communication units that provide the "voice of command" as well as the historical ties between the battalion and the 48th Infantry Brigade. The battalion’s military intelligence capability is represented by the sphinx which symbolizes the ability of military intelligence to "know all" on the battlefield. Seven stars on the insignia commemorate the four decorations and three major campaigns in which the unit has participated. The stars are arranged in an arrowhead formation symbolic of the Sapper’s mission of breaching enemy defenses.

Lieutenant Col. Bothwell Johnson commanded
the 101st AAA and 2nd Gun Battalion, 214th AAA from
1953-1960. Georgia National Guard Archives.
Unit History


Headquarters Company, 177th BEB was originally constituted in the Georgia Army National Guard in Statesboro, Ga. as Battery A, 264th Coast Artillery Battalion March 14, 1930.[2] On October 1, 1939, the 264th CAB was reorganized as the 1st Battalion 214th Field Artillery Group[3] with Battery A, commanded by Capt. Bothwell Johnson, reorganized as Battery C. Activated September 1940, the 214th was mobilized to the Pacific Theater of Operations and underwent reorganization in November 1943. The 1st Battalion 214th was redesignated the 528th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion with the Statesboro unit redesignated Battery C. The unit maintained this designation through the war and was inactivated in December 1945 at Camp Stoneman, Calif.

 

The 528th AAA was reestablished July 11, 1946.[4] In October, the 528th was consolidated into Headquarters Battery, 101st Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion and the resulting unit was designated Headquarters Battery, 101st Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.[5] The unit was reorganized and federally recognized June 17, 1947 in Statesboro.

 

STATESBORO, Ga. November, 1949 – The Statesboro-based Headquarters Battery and Battery A, 101st Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion paid Guardsmen
in silver dollars to show the merchants of Statesboro how much money the Guard brings into circulation each month. Georgia National Guard Archives.

On August 14, 1950, the unit was ordered into federal service due to the outbreak of hostilities in Korea. As part of the 108th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion, the unit was initially mobilized to Camp Bliss, Texas. The 108th AAA Brigade provided air defense over industrial areas from Chicago to Philadelphia until released from federal service in April 1952.[6]

 

On October 1, 1953, the unit was redesignated as Headquarters Battery, 101st Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion.[7]

 

Soldiers of the 2nd Gun Battalion, 214th Artillery Regiment adjust a radar antenna for use during annual training at Fort Stewart in July 1959.
Georgia National Guard Archives.

On July 1, 1959, the unit was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters Battery, 2nd Gun Battalion, 214th Field Artillery. This unit was converted and redesignated as Headquarters Company, 265th Engineer Battalion May 1, 1962.

 

The unit was consolidated with Company A, 265th Engineer Battalion January 1, 1968 and the units were converted and redesignated as Headquarters Battery, 2nd Battalion 214th Field Artillery.

 

648th Engineer Battalion sign from the Statesboro armory. Georgia National Guard Archives.

On September 1, 1993, the unit was converted and redesignated Detachment 1, 848th Engineer Company. One month later, the unit was expanded, reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters Company, 648th Engineer Battalion.[8]

FORT STEWART, Ga. 1996 - Second Lt. Rob Utlaut and 2nd Lt. Felix Childs during annual training for the 648th Engineer Battalion at Fort Stewart.
Photo courtesy of Matt Shannon.


The 648th Engineer Battalion was redesignated as the 48th Special Troops Battalion September 1, 2007.[9] The 48th BSTB was ordered into active federal service April 21, 2009 at home stations for service in Afghanistan with the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. The 48th BSTB was released from active Federal service May 25 2010 and reverted to state control.

Georgia Army National Guard soldiers from Statesboro's Headquarters Detachment 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion
deplane at Hunter’s Army Airfield March 17, 2010 following deployment to Afghanistan. Georgia National Guard  Archives.


Headquarters Company, Special Troops Battalion was converted and redesignated September 1, 2015 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 177th Engineer Battalion, an element of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team.[10] Since 2020, the 177th has been an active part of Georgia’s coordinated response to the COVID-19 pandemic providing personnel to hospitals for medical support and constituting infection control teams. During that time period, the 177th also mobilized personnel to the Country of Georgia for exercise Noble Partner 2020 and to the Southwest Border of the United States in 2021. In January 2021, the 177th BEB mobilized personnel to Washington DC to provide security during the presidential inauguration. The Soldiers departed the weekend prior to the inauguration and established security positions near the nation's capitol. By January 25, most of the Soldiers had either returned home or were in transit from Washington DC while others, joined by Soldiers of the 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade and TF 201st, remained on duty through March 13.

 

Soldiers of the 177th Brigade Engineer Battalion discuss the plan for disinfecting Dodge County Hospital April 27, 2020. Photo by Spc. Andre Josey.



[1] The Institute of Heraldry. “Distinctive Unit Insignia of the 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion.” https://tioh.army.mil/Catalog/HeraldryMulti.aspx?CategoryId=4422&grp=2&menu=Uniformed%20Services

[2] Military Department, State of Georgia. Pictorial Review of the National Guard of the State of Georgia. (Atlanta: 1939), 215.

[3] Center for Military History. “214th Lineage and Honors Certificate, 214th Field Artillery.”

[4] Military Department, State of Georgia. “General Order No. 17. Atlanta, Dec. 31, 1946.”

[5] Center for Military History. “214th Lineage and Honors Certificate, 214th Field Artillery.”

[6] Center for Military History. “214th Lineage and Honors Certificate, 214th Field Artillery.”

[7] Center for Military History. “214th Lineage and Honors Certificate, 214th Field Artillery.”

[8] Enter for Military History. “Lineage and Honors Certificate, 648th Engineer Battalion.”

[9] OA 112-08.

[10] OA 434-14, Corrected Copy 1, 3 February 2015.

Saturday, February 26, 2022

History of Company A, 1-121st Infantry Regiment

By Maj. William Carraway

Historian, Georgia Army National Guard

Guidons representing the history of Company A, 1st Battalion 121st Infantry Regiment in the 48th Infantry Division and 48th Armor Division.
Georgia National Guard Archives.

Organized and federally recognized in the Georgia National Guard’s 48th Infantry Division as the Cannon Company, 122nd Infantry Regiment February 26, 1948 in Covington, Ga., the company was reorganized as the 122nd’s heavy mortar company November 1, 1948[1]

FORT MCCLELLAN, Ala. August 20, 1955 - Having just dropped a round into their 4.2-inch mortar, these men of Covington's Heavy Mortar Company,
122nd Infantry Regiment, Georgia National Guard, await the blast that will send the projectile to its mark. Left to right are Pfc. Roger Bell,
Pfc. Albert Anglin and Pfc. Herman Shannon. Georgia National Guard Archives.


With the conversion of the 48th ID to Armor in October 1955, the company was redesignated Company A, 161st Tank Battalion.[2] A 1959 reorganization of the 48th AD prompted the company to reorganize as Company B, 248th Signal Battalion.[3] In 1963, the Georgia National Guard received all units of the 48th AD. In the reorganization that followed, Company B was redesignated Company A, 248th Signal Battalion.[4] With the inactivation of the 48th AD, Company A was redesignated the 180th Signal Company effective December 14, 1967.[5] The 180th served for more than decade before it was redesignated Company A, 111th Signal Battalion April 1, 1979.[6] The following year, the 111th Signal Battalion was reorganized as the 1st Battalion 122nd TOW Light Anti-Tank with the Covington unit serving as Company B.[7] 

FORT STEWART, Ga., July 1984 - Private Jimmy Nowell of Athens, a member of the Georgia Army National Guard's Company B, 1st Battalion, 122nd Infantry
at Covington, camouflages his TOW light anti-tank weapon while undergoing two weeks of annual training at Fort Stewart, Ga. Photo by the 124th MPAD.


In September 1992, the TLAT was inactivated and the Covington armory became home to Detachment 1, Company A and Detachment 1, Company B, 2nd Battalion 121st Infantry.[8] The detachments were consolidated September 1, 1993 to form Company A, 121st Infantry Regiment.[9] In 2004, Company A was consolidated in Lawrenceville with Company D, 1-121 and the consolidated unit was designated Company A.[10]

Fort Polk, La., May 2, 2018 - Georgia Army National Guardsman, Spc. Ryan Reese, an infantryman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment
helps a Georgia Guardsman prepare to install a Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System on his M4 rifle at the Joint Readiness Traning Center.
Photo by Pfc. Isaiah Matthews



[1] NGB AROTO 325.4-Ga. May 5, 1949.

[2] NG AROTO 325.4 (27 Jan 56)-Ga. March 6, 1956 effective March 26, 1956.

[3] RA 73-59 June 10, 1959, effective July 1, 1959.

[4] RA 57-63 March 21, 1963 Effective April 16, 1963.

[5] RA 71-67 December 14, 1967 Effective January 1, 1968.

[6] RA 64-79 March 20, 1979 Effective April 1, 1979.

[7] OA 182-80 September 26, 1980 effective October 1, 1980.

[8] OA 261-92 October 21, 1992 effective September 1, 1992.

[9] RA 169-93 August 9, 1993, effective September 1, 1993.

[10] OA 180-04 September 24, 2004 effective September 1, 2002.

Thursday, February 24, 2022

The 170th MP Battalion: Heraldry and History

By Major William Carraway

Historian, Georgia National Guard

 

Left: The distinctive unit insignia of the 170th MP Battalion. Right: The 170th command team circa 1978. 


Unit Insignia of the 170th MP Battalion.

On February 24, 1971, the US Army Institute of Heraldry approved the distinctive unit insignia of the 170th Military Police Battalion. The colors green and yellow represent the Military Police. The gothic arch symbolizes the areas comprising the Ardennes-Alsace, Rhineland and Central Europe campaigns and is used to represent the unit's participation there as the 179th Field Artillery Regiment during World War II. Red and green refer to the French Croix de Guerre awarded the unit for action along the Moselle River represented by the wavy beam. The fleur-de-lis is symbolic of France and refers to both the Normandy and the Northern France campaigns. The black disc simulates a cannon ball and together with the colors scarlet and gold (yellow) alludes to artillery, the unit's former designation. A doorway implies protection and barrier, and with the scale of justice refers to the overall mission of the organization. The unit motto, first in peace and in war is inherited from the 122nd Infantry Regiment which was redesignated the 179th Field Artillery Regiment in 1939.[1]

Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 122nd Infantry Regiment participate in a machine gun drill with an M1917A1 water-cooled machine gun in 1939.
Georgia National Guard Archives.


Formation and Early History[2]

The predecessor unit of the 170th MP Battalion was organized and federally recognized March 5, 1924 in the Georgia National Guard in Atlanta as Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion and Company C, 200th Infantry. On June 9, 1924, the unit was redesignated as Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, and Company C, 122d Infantry Regiment. 

On July 1, 1939, the unit was converted and redesignated as Headquarters Battery and Combat Train, 1st Battalion, and Battery C, 179th Field Artillery. One year later the unit was reorganized and redesignated 1 July 1940 as Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 179th Field Artillery.

 

World War II[3]

The 179th FA was inducted into federal service Feb. 24, 1941 in Atlanta. And on Feb. 8, 1943 was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters Battery and Battery C, 179th Field Artillery Battalion.

After serving in the European Operations, the 179th FA was inactivated Dec. 9, 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Va.

ATLANTA, April 21, 1955 Two- and-1/2-ton trucks of the 179th Field Artillery, 48th Armored Division loaded full of troops move out
from the Atlanta Armory during Operation Minuteman. Georgia National Guard Archives.

 

Post WWII Reorganizations

Upon the reorganization of the Georgia National Guard in July 1946, the 179th FA Battalion was assigned to the 48th Infantry Division.[4] The 179th was reorganized and federally recognized May 2, 1947 in Atlanta.[5] On Nov. 1, 1955, the 48th was reorganized as the 48th Armored Division and the 179th was redesignated as Headquarters Battery and Battery C, 179th Armored Field Artillery Battalion.[6]

 

FORT STEWART, Ga.  1959 - Two 8-inch self-propelled howitzers of the 1st Rocket/Howitzer Battalion, 179th Artillery from Atlanta, Ga. during
annual training of the 48th Armored Division at Fort Stewart, Ga.  Image courtesy of the National Guard Educational Foundation, Washington D.C.

Subsequent reorganizations in 1959[7] and 1963 established the unit as Headquarters Battery and Battery C, 1st Rocket Howitzer Battalion, 179th Artillery and Headquarters and Service Battery and Battery D, 1st Battalion, 179th Artillery, respectively. 

A reorganization of the 48th Armor Division January 1, 1968 consolidated Headquarters and Service Battery and Battery D. The consolidated unit was redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 170th Military Police Battalion.[8].

The 170th MP Battalion was initially comprised of a headquarters detachment and the 178th and 190th MP Companies.. The 178th was organized in Monroe where it is currently stationed. Originally organized in Atlanta, the 190th relocated to Kennesaw in 1997 after a brief stationing at Dobbins Air Reserve Base.[9]

On Sept. 30, 1999, Headquarters Detachment, 170th MP Battalion was consolidated with the 190th MP Company. The 190th MP Company carried forward the lineage and heritage of the 170th.[10]

Soldiers of the 170th Military Police Battalion salute the colors during the battalion change of command ceremony March 11, 2018 in Decatur, Ga.
Georgia National Guard photo by Capt. Charlie Emmons


The 170th was reorganized in Decatur September 1, 2007[11] and on Sept. 1, 2019, the 190th MP Company was consolidated with Headquarters Detachment. The lineage of the original 170th MP Battalion was thus restored to the 170th.[12] As of this date, the 170th MP Battalion, 178th and 179th MP Companies are assigned to the Marietta-based 201st Regional Support Group.

Soldiers of the 170th Military Police Battalion, 201st Regional Support Group, Georgia Army National Guard stand in formation to receive instructions
Sept. 1, 2021, at the battalion headquarters in Decatur, Georgia prior to mobilizing to Louisiana following Hurricane Ida. Photo by Staff Sgt. Jeron Walker.



[1] The Institute of Heraldry. “Distinctive Unit Insignia of the 170th MP Battalion.” https://tioh.army.mil/Catalog/Heraldry.aspx?HeraldryId=7011&CategoryId=3937&grp=2&menu=Uniformed%20Services&from=search

[2] Center for Military History. “190th MP Company Lineage and Honors Certificate.”

[3] Center for Military History. “190th MP Company Lineage and Honors Certificate.”

[4] Center for Military History. “190th MP Company Lineage and Honors Certificate.”

[5] Center for Military History. “190th MP Company Lineage and Honors Certificate.”

[6] NG AROTO325.4 October 17, 1955.

[7] RA 73-59 10 June 1959.

[8] RA 71-67 December 14, 1967, effective January 1, 1968.

[9] OA 199-97 August 22, 1997, effective September 1, 1997.

[10] OA 252-90 October 11, 1990 effective September 30, 1990.

[11] OA 97-05 October 28, 2005, effective September 1, 2007.

[12] OA 337-19 November 18, 2019 effective September 1, 2019.